Earnings Season is Here How will Markets React

Earnings season is here

U.S. indices logged modest gains after strong U.S. retail sales, building a week full of volatility. Investors juggled headlines on stimulus negotiations, the continuing COVID-19 crisis, and earnings season is here, kicking off this week. Last week all indexes finished slightly higher. The Dow up 0.07%, S&P up 0.21%, and Nasdaq up 0.79%.

Last Week

The tech titans propelled the Nasdaq higher, while the Dow and S&P 500 indexes sat flat. Bank earnings largely exceeded expectations. Banks were propelled by decent loan growth and dramatic decreases in loan loss provisions. The Philly Fed manufacturing index indicated activity picked up to its best level since February. Weekly unemployment claims rose to 898,000. Continuing unemployment claims fell sharply. Analysts note it is because many exhausted the 26-week limit. This strengthens the argument for U.S. lawmakers to act swiftly to provide relief from COVID-19’s lingering economic effects.

Markets struggled for direction last week as global COVID-19 cases rose to their highest levels since summer. The U.S. reported its highest daily infection count in two months and worldwide cases topped 39 million. Limited lock-downs in Europe are being called for amid the increases. Concerns surrounding the use of lock-downs and their impact, coupled with stalled stimulus talks domestically, made for choppy equity markets. September retail sales were seen rising by 1.9% last week as auto sales v-roomed ahead as they continue rebounding from second quarter lows.

The Week Ahead

While back-and-forth trade may persist, longer-term technical indicators look constructive. Earnings season will likely play second fiddle to stimulus negotiations, election polls, and vaccine progress. Eighty S&P 500 names report earnings this week, highlighted by Procter and Gamble, Verizon, Netflix, Southwest Airlines, and Coca-Cola. Given recent consumer data, upside surprises for many names seem plausible. Economic data to watch will be Tuesday’s housing starts and building permits. Thursday’s unemployment claims, will also be watched closely, to see if the negative trend build. As election uncertainty continues, focusing on events that are likely to occur can add some investing clarity. The U.S. should have a vaccine sometime in the next few months. There will likely be another large round of federal stimulus in the next few months. The Fed will likely keep rates near zero for as long as the economy needs it.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 0.24%, S&P up 7.83%, and Nasdaq up 30.08% through the close on Friday.

Have a fun and safe week!

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Presidential Virus Case and Impact on the Markets

Presidential Virus

Happy fall y’ll! The President has contracted the virus. Lawmakers are working on a coronavirus relief bill. Jobs continue to recover, but at a slower than expected rate. Last week all indexes finished up. The Dow up 1.9%, S&P 1.5%, and Nasdaq 1.5%. The markets fell mid last week as news of the Presidential virus emerged, before rallying by the weeks end.

Last Week

Despite President Trump testing positive for coronavirus, equities ended a volatile week higher. Investors became more upbeat about a potential stimulus package. The positive test for the President does creates near term uncertainty. However, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said President Trump’s prognosis changed the shape of talks over a new stimulus package. In economic news, non-farm payrolls continued to improve with 661,000 jobs added in September. These numbers are below the consensus of 859,000 jobs. The unemployment rate dropped to 7.9% from 8.4% in August. The pace of growth in the manufacturing sector slowed in September. But still expanded with an ISM Manufacturing Index reading of 55.4.

Consumer spending was up 1% over the prior month. This is the 4th straight monthly increase, and is now down roughly 2% compared to a year ago. Initial jobless claims for the week ended September 26 were 837,000. Marking the 5th consecutive week between 800,000 and 900,0000. Continued claims, or the number of people already receiving unemployment benefits, fell by nearly 1 million. This marks the lowest level since March. The jobs report released Friday showed the U.S. economy added 661,000 jobs in September. This data was below expectations, while the unemployment rate fell to 7.9%. The economy has now recovered about half of the 22 million jobs lost in March and April. Adding 11.4 million jobs from May through September.

The Week Ahead

Looking ahead, the path of COVID-19 and the presidential election will remain at the forefront of investors’ minds. In addition, the major banks will report results starting in less than two weeks. This will provide a good barometer of the health of the overall economy. President Trump’s health is a huge macro risk with far reaching financial market implications. Just weeks away from the Presidential election, it is clear anything can happen. The base case is for a full recovery. However, polls could move in the coming weeks as voters assess his health and his tone on the virus. Furthermore, the Supreme Court nomination and the battle over fiscal stimulus remain key topics. Neither of which look to be resolved easily. Fed chair Powell will offer insights into the economic outlook today.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been on the attack for over seven months now. We are still anxiously awaiting a medical breakthrough that will help us better coexist with this virus. There is a good chance the virus may never go away, according to experts. In late September, Dr. Anthony Fauci, commented that COVID-19 vaccinations could begin as early as November or December. In all likelihood, a vaccine will not be available prior to election day on 11/3/20. As a result, things could get a bit bumpy in the markets in October based on the daily news feed. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 3.0%, S&P up 3.6%, and Nasdaq up 28.8% through the close on Friday.

Have a great week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Historical performance figures for the indices are for illustrative purposes only and not indicative of any actual investment.

Markets Retreat after the Fed Chairman Said This

Fed Chairman

Welcome to fall 2020! Stocks rallied early last week, then fell after the Fed meeting on Wednesday. Last week all indexes finished flat or down. The Dow barely dropped 0.03%, S&P was down 0.64%, and Nasdaq down 0.56%. Tech stocks continued to sell off, leading to the Nasdaq’s 3rd straight weekly decline.

Last Week

The markets see-sawed through the week before finishing lower. Stalemate in Washington over any kind of relief bill continued. The Fed meeting on Wednesday was highlighted by projections to keep interest rates near zero through 2023. Economic data missed the mark too. Retail sales came in lower than expected. The weekly unemployment claims came in higher than expectations of 860,000. Housing starts and building permit data came in lower than expected. The decline of housing data compared to July is likely attributed to higher lumber prices.

More on the Fed. Low interest rates enhance the value of all equities. The Fed indicated this past week that it intends to keep its overnight federal funds rate target at 0-0.25% until 2023. They also said they would continue purchasing Treasuries and agency mortgage-backed securities. Chairman Powell said they will keep this stance until the labor market returns to full employment. Pre-covid unemployment rates were 3.5%.

The Week Ahead

The Federal Reserve chairman, Jerome Powell, speaks on Tuesday. Many agree the recovery has slowed, so to what degree that slowing has occurred will be seen in the latest reports. Fed chair Powell’s testimony on the CARES Act could contain market-moving morsels on Tuesday and Wednesday, as could treasury Secretary Mnuchin’s testimony on Thursday. Another week of high unemployment claims looms, but so far, the market remains relatively content with the labor market’s status. Friday’s durable goods orders offers insight into capital expenditure intentions among companies, and it’s poised to decline slightly. The elephant in the room for the market is the Presidential election, now roughly 6 weeks away.

Looking ahead to October. October is a peculiarly dangerous month to speculate in stocks. According to the Trader’s Almanac, that is especially true in presidential-election years. Since 1952, the Dow industrial averaged a 0.8% decline in those years. The S&P 500 index averaged a 0.7% drop. In Octobers of election years, the market was generally up when the incumbent party won. Not surprising as bull markets tend to favor the party in power. Clarity on the next 4 years will be here soon! Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 3.09%, S&P up 2.75%, and Nasdaq up 20.29% through the close on Friday.

Have a great week!

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How the Markets are Moving – Market Brief September 14, 2020

How the Markets are Moving

With school back in session, the markets have slumped for two weeks now. Last week all indexes finished down. The Dow down 3.3%, S&P 2.5%, and Nasdaq 4.0%. Following the long weekend, the markets fell right from the start. Technology stocks led the free fall, as investors continue to selloff the big winners. Continue reading for the latest Market Brief and insight into how the markets are moving.

Last Week

The S&P 500 index finished last week with the worst performance since June. The next coronavirus relief package hangs in limbo as Senate Democrats and Republicans remain miles apart. Investors continue to fear lasting volatility from the looming Presidential election. According to Predict-It, Democratic candidate Biden has a 17% lead over the incumbent. The Fed recently said it would no longer preemptively raise interest rates to prevent higher inflation. Instead, the Fed will wait to tighten monetary policy until there is clear evidence of inflation running above its target of 2%.

Counter intuitively, volatility indices finished much softer despite turbulence in equities. The weekly unemployment claims figured held steady at 884k, above estimates. 884K is the lowest level of initial unemployment claims since broad economic shutdowns took effect in March, suggesting the labor market continues to make progress in its recovery. The total number of people claiming benefits in all programs rose 380,000 to 29.6 million.

The Week Ahead

Technical levels may be a primary driver of flows, but a busy data slate awaits investors this week. Chinese growth rates will be released today. On Wednesday, U.S. retail sales figures are published and the Federal Reserve is meeting to update economic projections. If passed, probability is rising that any stimulus package is going to be underwhelming. The Fed’s updated projections may show slower growth, hotter inflation, and stationary policy for longer.

On the data front, Chinese growth figures are poised for a modest increase, while U.S. retail sales are expected to slip slightly. Thursday’s unemployment claims will be closely watch for any reversal higher, while housing data is expected to remain robust. Lastly, an updated look at consumer sentiment will close out what looks to be a busy and pivotal week for global financial markets.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 3.06%, S&P up 3.41%, and Nasdaq up 20.96% through the close on Friday.

Have a great week!

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The Great Divide – Economy and Markets

The Great Divide - Economy and Markets

The Dog Days are here! School is back in session, some in-person, some virtual. The virus continues to be present and the economy slowly is rebuilding while the markets continue to climb. Last week indexes finished slightly up. The Dow up 1.8%, S&P up 0.64%, and Nasdaq up 0.08%. The S&P began the week rising for it’s 7th straight session in the green and briefly passed the all-time high on Wednesday. The flat performance was a result of uncertainty with economic data, the latest virus patterns, and a second fiscal stimulus package that never was.

Last Week

The S&P 500 index is close to record territory once again. The economy and the stock market seem far off. Thursday marked the 100th day since the market lows on March 23. The markets have rebounded 50% since then. A strong recovery for investors, while millions have lost jobs and over 160,000 Americans have lost their lives. Management reports on earnings calls have been surprised at the speed and scale of the demand rebound. Many companies expected a short lived drop, followed by a gradual recovery. Not so much the “snap-back” experienced.

It is encouraging that the U.S. has added back millions of jobs lost during the first wave. Last Thursday marked the first jobless claims report under 1 million since March. Also, from earnings calls, consensus views are pointing towards record breaking earnings next year. Strongly supported by interest rates, which continue to be favorable for the foreseeable future. Investor fears over companies falling into financial distress are offset by the Feds support of buying bonds and Congress spending on relief. Retail sales also rose in July 1.2% higher than June, setting a new all-time high, and another sign of recovery.

The Week Ahead

The equity markets will have their eyes on Washington in hopes of a new stimulus. On Thursday, unemployment claims will be reported and the hope is that a under 1 million trend goes on. Continuing unemployment claims are still above 15 million, however, this is much lower than the 25 million in May. Stress for parents remains as school openings have created more unrest than security. How the school year unfolds for parents will no doubt impact the workforce productivity. Some areas of the country have already started so watching closely for signs that reopening in person can be done safely is key.

At the end of the day, it is clear the markets and the economy are not one in the same. Very different directions, as reflected in year-to-date index performance; Dow down 2.1%, S&P up 4.4%, and Nasdaq up 22.8% through the close on Friday.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief – 2020 Mid-Year Review

Market Brief 2020 Mid-Year Review

Dog days of summer have arrived. For 2020, it feels like the dog days arrived in March. From the moment the pandemic began to spread, to stay-at-home orders, to lock-downs, to protest rallies, to reopening phases, and back to more restrictions… what a year, and we are only halfway home. Didn’t even mentions the murder hornets! Let’s take a minute to catch our breath and see where we have been, where we are, and where we will go. Currently, we are in the midst of earnings season. Big name stocks will report second quarter earnings this week. Last week the main indexes finished mixed. The Dow up 2.3%, S&P up 1.25%, and Nasdaq down 1.1%. The S&P 500 outperformed the Nasdaq index by the widest margin since February 2016. The markets were mainly buoyed by progress of a virus vaccine.

What Happened?

The year started off strong through mid-February. Early cases and the fast spread of the coronavirus took hold in Asia and quickly jumped country borders to become a worldwide pandemic. Just about a month from the market peak in February came the market lows in March, a 33.9% drop for the S&P index. In just a few weeks, the U.S. economy erased 7 years of employment gains. 30 million Americans lost jobs, driving unemployment as high as 22% in April. By June, the unemployment rate hovered around 14%. Still extremely high, but significantly lower from 2 months prior.

In March, the Fed stepped in and provided a backstop to the equity markets. Stabilizing and possibly adding turbo to the economy via stimulus for individuals and businesses. The pandemic accelerated tech disruption. It changed how companies reach consumers, how supply chains work, how to deal with remote employees, and still build their brands.

Where Are We Today?

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 6.54%, S&P down 0.2%, and Nasdaq up 17.0% through the close on Friday. Last week, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin said the Trump administration and Senate leadership are discussing a new stimulus bill. The end of July is the target time frame as the previous stimulus benefits are ending. The housing market reports are exceeding expectation. Current metrics show a shortage of existing home inventory, limited housing labor to build new homes, and a shortage of entry level homes for the first time home buyer. Historically low mortgage rates help boost the housing demand. Labor income across the board is surging and consumer spending is rebounding.

The markets are in fairly good position today. Much of the strength is attributed to the Fed and swift implementation of monetary policy. With interest rates near zero, investors are willing to pay for future earnings. Growth stocks have done well, value stocks have lagged. When the economy improves and interest rates rise, growth stocks will be challenged by high valuations. Communities have begun to re-open. The U.S. seems to have chosen independence over lock-down. This has led to a recent uptick in coronavirus cases. Deaths due to the virus have decreased as health care has gotten smarter about how to handle symptomatic cases. The resurgence of hiring and end of mass layoffs indicate the job market is recovering. While the decreasing layoffs and increasing hires offer hope, the reopening process has been trending in the wrong direction.

Where Are We Going?

It’s election season. From here on out, politics will headline media reports. Snippets and quotes from leadership on both sides will sway the markets. Bigger than the election is the Fed’s actions. Interest rates are low and likely to remain low for a very long time. This creates a scenario of easy lending and the opportunity for trillions of dollars to remain invested in the market. The future months will measured by the resurgence of the coronavirus, how quickly a vaccine can be developed, another round of monetary stimulus, and the upcoming election. If you thought the first half of 2020 was a roller coaster, the second half might be just as wild! Take care and be safe.

Market Brief’s are taking a summer hiatus, see you at the end of August!

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Market Brief July 6, 2020

Market Brief July 6 2020

Welcome back after the holiday weekend. The markets welcomed us back with a big day today, all indexes were in the green! This positive trend is a continuation from the previous week. Last week all indexes finished up. The Dow up 3.3%, S&P 4.0%, and Nasdaq 4.6%. The markets had a short week due to the holiday observance on Friday. Virus cases continue to rise. The Fed remains extremely helpful. And election season is right around the corner.

Last Week

The markets shrugged off the rising Covid cases. The S&P 500, Dow, and Nasdaq all finished their best quarters in decades. Manufacturing data was better than expected. June payroll was released last Thursday morning, and the positive report sent stocks soaring. The report indicated that 4.8 million jobs were added in the month of June. The U.S. reported a daily record of 52,000 new cases in a 24-hour period. The Fed continues to pump money into the economy. Chances of another round of stimulus are high. And progress for a Covid vaccine get better each day.

The Week Ahead

The markets are in a historically bullish time frame, June 26-July 11. Historically, the market gains 6.3% over this time frame. If history repeats, the indexes could hit all-time highs. On the flip side, it is an election year. The markets tend to fall prior to the election. The beginning of earnings season could help buck the trend as quarterly reports will be released in mid-July.

The U.S. labor market has recouped nearly 1/3 of March and April job losses, but employment fractures linger. Initial jobless claims have provided one of the most current pictures of the state of the economy and have stayed stubbornly high. Continuing claims came in at 19 million last week, so many Americans are still receiving unemployment benefits. This suggest s that either the first wave of job losses continues, or businesses that have re-opened are beg inning to shutter. With the increase of Covid cases, another lock-down is not likely, but delayed progression is inevitable.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 9.5%, S&P down 3.1%, and Nasdaq up 13.8% through the close on Friday.

Have a great week. Stay cool and safe!

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Market Brief June 29, 2020

Market Brief June 29 2020

Summer is full swing and so is the heat! The markets continue to sweat up and down. Last week all indexes finished down. The Dow down 3.3%, S&P 2.8%, and Nasdaq 1.9%. The markets fell mid last week as virus cases rose. More states delayed or paused reopening plans. Some small businesses chose to close their own stores.

Last Week

The V-shaped economic recovery is being challenged. Virus cases rose over 30% in some states last week. 33 states showed increases in cases. States, such as Texas and Florida, closed bars and reduced restaurant capacity. Bank shares fell as the Fed ordered them to stop share buyback programs and dividend payouts. The global economy shows signs of recovery based on PMI economic reports. The indexes fell for the second weekly loss in the past three weeks.

The Week Ahead

The markets are closed on Friday in observance of Independence Day holiday. Jobs data being released on Thursday morning will headline the reporting week. Pending home sales in May were expected to increase 18%, and the reading came in at 44.3% for May! That is good news for the economy. In fact, the coronavirus contraction could end up being the shortest U.S. recession ever. And the recession may already be over. Despite the worst part potentially behind us, recovery will take a long time. During 10 recessions since 1950, it took an average of 30 months for the lost jobs to finally return. Not to mention, the two previous recoveries took longer, 4 and 6 years respectively. Many more jobs were lost from the virus, so the rebound might be here now, but full recovery may take much longer.

To put the recession behind us two points are in focus. The first, improving health situation. Second, continued federal government support. The latter picture is more clear. The former, not so much. Federal unemployment benefits expire at the end of July. However, with the recent rise in cases, renewing these benefit programs may be a reality. Current discussion for another round of stimulus includes $1.5 trillion package. At the end of the day, the markets continue to worry about another outbreak. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 12.3%, S&P down 6.8%, and Nasdaq up 8.74% through the close on Friday.

Have a fun and safe 4th of July holiday!

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Market Brief May 18 2020

Market Brief May 18 2020

Fed Chair Powell reiterated the committee’s outlook for the economy was highly uncertain and that unemployment may peak in the coming month. Another 2.9 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, bringing the 8-week total to nearly 37 million. The bright side, continuing claims ‘only’ rose to 22.8 million from 22.4 million. This is another week of increasing claims at a decreasing rate. The markets all finished down for the week. It was the Dow and Nasdaq’s worst week since week ended April 3, and the S&P 500’s worst week since March 20.

Last Week

Volatility rose last week as confidence in the recovery and re-openings went back and forth. With some parts of the country slowly opening, there are glimmers of hope. Consumer confidence, measured by the University of Michigan, rose slightly in the May preliminary reading. Mortgage applications rose for the fourth straight week. Refinancing slowed, but it is still up 200% compared to the previous year, spurred by low interest rates.

At the same time, U.S and China are back at each other. The Trump administration ordered the federal employee retirement fund not to invest in Chinese companies. Specifically, companies that could be sanctioned for actions supporting the spread of the coronavirus. The unemployment total for the last two months has now reached 36.5 million Americans. For the week, the Dow fell 2.7%, the S&P 500 fell 2.3%, and the Nasdaq fell 1.2%.

This Week

As the economy goes through an unsynchronized reopening process, it seems apparent that any decline in unemployment is unlikely to match the pace of its ascent higher. Economists are projecting the U.S. economy to contract at 6.6% this year. The previous estimate was a contraction of 4.9%. The high unemployment, coupled with declining consumption and a fresh spat between U.S./China keeps everything on the rocks.

Politically, lawmakers are weighing a fresh stimulus. The House passed the $3 trillion spending plan. On the data watch, U.S. building permits will be released on Tuesday. This gauge indicates housing activity as some states edge back to “normal”. Thursday, weekly unemployment claims will be released, and Fed Chair Powell speaks. Wall Street investors will be very tuned into what he has to say.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 17.0%, S&P down 11.4%, and Nasdaq up 0.5%.

Have a fun and safe Halloween week!

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Market Brief May 11 2020

Market Brief May 11 2020

The markets finished up last week. Surprising to some investors as the unemployment numbers for April hit a record setting 20 million. This equates to an unemployment figure of 14.7%! To put the job loss in perspective, from October 2010 to February 2020, the economy added 22.1 million jobs. Last Thursday, 3.1m former workers filed for unemployment benefits. However, it was the 5th straight week when the number of applicants fell. For some, this is a signal of improvement. This also may point to the fact that the worst is behind us. The forward looking market is ready for a turnaround.

Last Week

States are re-opening and sharing their blueprints with others to follow. Companies reporting earnings last week continued to withdraw guidance. Companies are sharing less than optimistic commentary. Economic reports have met the ugly reality, but have not exceeded those benchmarks. This has helped prop up the markets for now. Along with positive news regarding potential vaccine for Covid. The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week – Dow up 2.6%, S&P 3.5%, and Nasdaq 6.0%.

During the earnings came the release of dividend status. The number of dividends increased in April totaled 19, down from 30 a year ago. Year-to-date, dividend increases totaled 144, down from 148 over the same period a year ago. Twelve dividends were cut in April, compared to one cut a year ago. Twelve dividends were suspended in April, bringing the total to 22 for 2020. This is a sign of uncertainty and caution among companies. Instead of paying a dividend, these companies are raising cash on hand, paying down debt, or using for day-to-day operating expenses until “normal” returns.

Week Ahead

Investors are currently looking at the bright side and trying to figure out when normal is back. Closely watching how states are re-opening and if Covid cases begin to increase in those states. The retail sales report on Friday will tell us one of two things. Is the consumer completely locked down, including their wallets? Or, has the quarantine led to regular or even higher spending with people sitting around their house all day? Other economic news, CPI and PPI will both be released next week as investors digest the impact of the slowdown on both the economy and the stock market.

Continued U.S. and China tension is back on the front burner. Similar to the back-and-forth in 2019, market swill ebb and flow with the latest tweet, response, and action taken by each side. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down -14.7%, S&P down -9.3%, and Nasdaq up 1.7%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief May 4, 2020

Market Brief May 4 2020

The markets are unsure. Strange to say it, but the markets do not know what to think of the current situation. The market makers are trying to figure out what happens next. Right now, we are sitting in no man’s land. The volatility has calmed down. Current volatility is less than half from the peak in March. Unemployment is through the roof. 30 million unemployment claims have been filed in the last 5 weeks. The Fed stepped in, like the knight in shining armor and made tremendous moves to help companies and individuals. However, we are not back to business as usual. And we do not have a definitive time frame to do so. And we still have people dying everyday and more are still contracting the virus.

Last Week

The markets went up as states slowing began allowing businesses to reopen. Better news came on Wednesday when the drug company Gilead, announced it’s drug met preliminary goals in a study. The end of the week was not as good. Thursday’s jobless claims piled on an already ridiculously high number. On Friday, news of the U.S. retaliating towards China sent the markets even lower heading into the weekend.

For the week, the Dow finished down 0.22%, S&P 500 down 0.21%, and the Nasdaq down 0.34%.

Looking Ahead

Focus will be on the states that reopened; Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. If there is a spike in virus cases, restrictions may be imposed. If those states do not see a resurgence in virus cases, others might be encouraged to lift their restrictions sooner. The economic data is numbing. The has not been positive economic news as of late. Investors understand it is ugly, and the reports could get worse before improving.

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin has forecast a fall in 2nd-quarter growth, with a bounce back in July. For the year, the Dow is down 16.8%, S&P 500 down 12.4%, and Nasdaq down 4.1%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief April 27 2020

Market Brief April 27 2020

The markets snapped a 2-week win streak, falling slightly last week. As expected, the economic news was dismal. Unemployment numbers continue to rise. The five week total now exceeds 26 million. The virus continues to wreak havoc, claiming over 200,000 lives around the world, and over 50,000 in the United States. Markets slid as news reported that drug remdesivir, from Gilead Sciences, results were less than positive.

Global manufacturing data dropped on the lowest output, new orders, and employment numbers on record. The oil industry tanked early in the week as contracts were expiring, before recovering by weeks end. Oil’s roller coaster is attributable to low demands for oil, oversupply, and speculation of May crude oil. Low oil prices is great for everyone, except, nobody can go anywhere! So the relief at the pump for unemployed individuals does not go as far as when there is full employment. U.S. home sales fell last week. Durable goods orders dropped over 14% in April.

Despite the efforts of further government stimulus, to aid small business and the overall unemployment picture, the indexes finished down. For the week ending 4/24, the Dow finished down 1.9%, S&P down 1.3%, and the Nasdaq down 0.2%.

The Week Ahead

Today starts a big week of corporate earnings, with 172 companies reporting. Notably the big tech names; Apple, Amazon, FaceBook, and Microsoft. According to FactSet, for the 24% of S&P 500 companies already reporting, the blended earnings decline for the first quarter is -15.8%.

Many companies have suspended their guidance. Thus far, 106 of the S&P 500 companies suspended 2020 guidance. That leaves investors with little to work off of. The companies dropping guidance are following the advice from the SEC. Instead, the calls are focused on the current assessment of the situation and how it affects their business right now.

The economic data paints a dismal picture. Continued focus will be on Thursday’s unemployment figure. Other data of interest this week include Mortgage Applications, Personal Income, and US Manufacturing. None of which will be a surprise, however, the data will provide clarity regarding just how bad. The key for investors is to focus on how quickly we are going to recover. This will depend on finding ways to carefully ease lockdowns. Also, how severe the Coronavirus will be in the months ahead and how quickly vaccines are made. Year-to-date, the Dow is down 16.7%, S&P down 12.2%, and the Nasdaq down 3.8%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief April 20 2020

Market Brief April 20 2020

The market rally continued. Finishing strong Friday due to a potential COVID-19 treatment. The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week. Dow up 2.2%, S&P 3.0%, and Nasdaq 6.1%. Not all was good as many banks reported earnings last week. The large banks are preparing for potential consumer and corporate loan defaults. Unemployment increases continue. In the last four weeks, 22 million Americans have filed for unemployment. This volume erases ten years of job growth. Retail Sales dropped in March and Industrial Production fell to the lowest level since 1946.

So why did the markets finish higher? Good question. The markets response was focused on two things. First, the potential vaccine treatment. If this treatment works or has a strong recovery rate, this is great news for the current time and the future. The markets want to be reassured if the virus returns there is a defense in place. Second, President Trump announced a plan to reopen states. Going back to “normal” is good for small business, consumers, and income earners. It is clear “life after virus” will be different, igniting the economy is certainly a positive for financial markets.

The Week Ahead

COVID-19 hospitalizations are declining in hotspot areas. Government officials are working on plans to gradually reopen their states. On Thursday, another round of unemployment claims is expected. Friday’s durable goods order report will shed light on business spending amid the health crisis.

Corporate earnings season continues. The focus of these calls remain to be the gauge of how negatively affected consumption and credit have been for both consumers and businesses. As well as, the prospects of doing business during the next few quarters. And lastly, for firms not on solid footing, investors will look to their liquidity as key indicator of strength going forward.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 15.0%, S&P down 11.0%, and Nasdaq up 3.6%. As the post image says, “Together We Do It” – Have a safe week!

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Positive Investing News

Positive Investing News

Finding good news right now can be tough. The Q&A below highlights some of the positive investing news that can result from a crisis.

What is the one positive that you see coming out of this crisis
that is least expected?

Buying opportunity! Valuations have soared during the bull market run following the 2008-2009 recession, individuals interested in long-term investment growth should consider this as one of the best discount sales in recent years. Many people I speak to wish they could go back to the 2008-2009 time period and buy stocks. Today, some quality companies are down 30-80% year-to-date.

What new businesses will break into the marketplace, as a result of this crisis, that no one expected to grow so fast?

Technology has proven to be the winner. The S&P 500 Info Tech sector index has greatly outperformed the market. Included in this index are businesses supporting those working from home, such as, video conferencing and e-document companies. 

What existing industries do you feel will rebound the fastest
as things begin to return to normal?

The travel industry is taking an enormous hit. This will not last. Consider how many people will need a vacation after being stuck in their homes for a month (or longer). Or even had their trips postponed. Hotels, airlines, cruises, they are beaten down right now but will bounce back as the virus is contained. The stimulus will also aid, to some extent, discretionary spending for some. Travel is a huge component of discretionary spending.

Click here if you would like to learn more about our thoughts on Positive Investing News. Also, to discuss options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Portfolio Management Perspective

Portfolio Management Perspective

Review of Benchmarks, Strategy, Risk, and Performance – Perspective from one of our Portfolio Manager’s – March 13, 2020

Whenever the topic of investing is discussed we are conditioned to think first of the New York Stock Exchange opening bell and Wall St. bankers in Brioni suits. And why shouldn’t we? Over the past 200 years, stocks have arguably been the most powerful generator of wealth.
 
That rosy conventional wisdom has the benefit of a perpetual time-horizon and an ambivalence towards risk. As we all know, stocks might be notorious for rising over time, but they also can produce nasty results if improperly managed. Very few of us are fortunate enough to be ambivalent towards risk or the trajectory of our investments – if we were, being 100% invested in the DOW or S&P 500 would be a fine strategy. That is where financial planning and asset management comes in.
 
As a conservative asset manager, we are tasked with two main objectives a) produce a rate of return that achieves an objective (generally retirement/self-sufficiency) and b) protect against downside and volatility.  Our definition of success in both goals is directly related to the specifics of your financial situation. 
 
Since the inception of our Total Return strategy in 2004, we’ve employed a mix of equities (stocks), commodities, fixed income, and cash to achieve the objectives stated above for clients. At any given point, we may be more dependent on one asset class or another to provide upside thrust or downside support for our clients’ portfolios. As you might expect, this asset mix is largely dependent on (among other things) the outlook for the economy, interest rates, and the inclination for risk in the markets.
 
In some environments, such as 2017, the stock market and high-quality individual equities genuinely are the best option for capital appreciation.  In other periods such as late 2018 and 2019, a choppy market and unclear fundamental prospects warranted a higher concentration in traditionally less economically sensitive asset classes like bonds, gold, and cash. No matter the environment, we are continually assessing our outlook and corresponding exposures.

In the client updates over the past week, we noted how our conservative positioning at the outset of this decline was yielding promising results. That remains the case, and when we evaluate client performance relative to equity benchmarks (DOW, S&P 500, NASDAQ), we are heartened by the fact that client accounts have a) declined substantially less than the benchmarks and b) exceeded the results previously experienced in similar periods of stress.
 
Since our inception, having a trained eye on risk management has allowed clients to generally experience asymmetric rates of upside and downside participation vs. equity benchmarks. In other words, we’ve consistently achieved more upside than downside through the course of market trends. 
 
Finally, we understand that the personal nature of the virus and the corresponding downside reaction in markets can be especially anxiety provoking.  And while this is everybody’s first time managing through a true pandemic, it is far from our first time managing through a panicked market.  We will get through this turbulent time and be prepared to deploy the capital we’ve preserved throughout the episode.

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief February 24 2020

Market Brief February 24 2020

The last week in February is here and the markets have dropped on the news of the increasing spread of the coronavirus. Impact beyond health concerns is the slowdown in supply chains for companies, and the downward effect on economic activity. The US economic report of the Services PMI dropped to a 76-month low in February. This follows a January report that was at a 5-month high. The bright spots from last week are found in manufacturing confidence and housing reports. Both housing starts and building permits figures remain at decade highs, with housing starts at the highest level since 2006. WalMart’s earnings report was positive, in-line with expectations. Significant to the investor, as WalMart is a good gauge of the consumer strength, and sales were up 5.7% last year. With that said, the Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished down last week. The Dow down 1.4%, S&P 1.3%, and Nasdaq 1.6%.

This week will have plenty of economic reports to digest, but the coronavirus developments remain top priority. Tuesday’s consumer confidence report will shed light on whether consumers are concerned with the virus or not. Globally, Chinese banks may be on rocky ground. During the month of January, banks in China had loaned 3 times the amount that was loaned in December. Corporate loans also increased 7 times during the same time period. Debt levels this high could cause concern for long-term recovery and repayment issues.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 1.59%, S&P up 3.31%, and Nasdaq up 6.73%. I continue to encourage buy and hold investing for the long run and potential short-term disruptions can give investors long term opportunities.

Have a great week!

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief February 10 2020

Market Brief February 10 2020

Valentine’s Day is almost here, and the stock market continues to show investors plenty of love! The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 3%, S&P 3.17%, and Nasdaq 4.04%. The coronavirus remains a serious threat, but markets shrugged off the virus news in favor of positive U.S. manufacturing data, strong jobs reports, and company earnings. The Dow and S&P index finished the week with the best performance since the 5 trading days leading up to June 7, 2019. The Nasdaq had it’s best week since November 30, 2018.

The number of coronavirus cases continue to grow and estimates of economic growth for China continue to fall. The coronavirus has spread to different industries at different times. Initially, the travel and oil industries took a hit, as obvious travel restrictions were put into place. Oil prices are down 20% since January. Retail chains, such as Starbucks, also took a hit as many stores in China were closed. Currently, the healthcare industry is taking it on the chin, due to cancelled surgeries and disruption in supply chain. Technology may be on the horizon, as companies like Apple look at their own supply chain and impact the virus will have on production. Throughout February corporate earnings calls, the theme was similar, it is too early to tell the impact, but keep a close eye on what is happening. As of last night, the coronavirus death toll has exceeded that of the SARS virus.

Enter Federal Reserve. After Wednesday’s meeting, Wall Street was leaning towards another rate cut. This belief evaporated by Friday when the jobs report was released and the results were very strong. In Germany, industrial production fell in December by 3.5%, the largest drop post-financial crisis. Global woes remain an area of concern.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 1.98%, S&P up 3.0%, and Nasdaq up 6.1%. What else? For the S&P companies reporting in January, no dividends were cut, same result as January 2019, and 41 companies increased their dividends, which is up from 36 a year ago. Due to low bond yields, investors are flocking to real estate mutual funds and REIT investments. As reported by EPFR Global, $11B of money flowed into mutual funds with a real estate focus in 2019, and another $3B has moved there in 2020.

Have a great week!

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief January 21 2020

Market Brief January 21 2020

The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 1.8%, S&P 2.0%, and Nasdaq 2.3%. The indices continued to rise from solid economic reports coming from the housing, retail, and pricing reports, as well as, easing tensions between the U.S. and China. With the trade news somewhat behind us, focus turns towards corporate profits as Q4 earnings season is underway.

This week includes 58 more earnings reports by S&P 500 companies, along with home sales data and jobs numbers keeping investors attention. U.S. existing home sales have missed three consecutive months, so Wednesday’s report will be important. Inflation remains a major headwind for investors.

Caution ahead. The yield curve inversion in 2019 still lingers. As market history proves, the inverted yield curve foresees recession up to 2 years following the initial inversion. Wage growth and corporate earnings. As wages continue to rise and unemployment remains historically low, this puts companies in a tough position. As the expenses rise, the dilemma is whether to pass the cost to the customer, or eat it. Either way, this can lead to a negative outlook for stocks, as companies either will have shrinking margins, or contribute to inflation by way of rising prices. This is worth keeping an eye on going forward.

Have a great week!

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.