Coronavirus and Panic for Life Insurance

Life insurance and the panic for life insurance

The events of the last two months have brought plenty of craze to the insurance world, specifically life insurance. I am using this post to outline and provide clarity around life insurance planning during this time time of a virus outbreak.

People are looking for life insurance due to the coronavirus.
Should people panic and buy life insurance?

The best practice for whether to buy insurance depends on your individual needs. Despite coronavirus, you either need a policy to protect family, business, estate, etc., or you do not. The coronavirus certainly can cause you to think about your plan, as there is no cure at the moment, which draws concern to folks without a plan in place. However, the virus is no different from any other health scare or accident – cancer, heart attack, car crash – all these events will prompt you to rethink your plan and get coverage in place.

Follow this link to learn more about the different types of life insurance.

What should people know and look for that are interested in
buying a policy right away due to the pandemic?
 

Complete an application while you are healthy. If you wait and contract illness, the insurance companies will review your medical records and may have hesitation to approve your policy at the preferred rating. Worse yet, hospitalization or death could seriously impact your chances of an approved policy.

Are there any exclusions people should be aware of? 

If you are healthy and need coverage get it. Do not wait. The younger and healthier you are, the more favorable the cost. It is uncertain how the underwriters at the insurance companies will consider an illness, such as the coronavirus, when reviewing insurance applications. 

What could keep someone from being able to get a life
insurance immediately?
How long should they expect it to take
for the policy to start?

Insurance policies are largely based on your health and age. If you are old and have poor medical history, chances of getting a policy approved would be difficult. Previous medical history with life threatening illnesses, such as cancer, can also impact your ability to obtain coverage. Having bad habits, such as using tobacco, or a bad driving record, such as multiple DUI’s, also impact your ability to get an approved policy at the best rate. Policies can start at the time of application with what is referred to as “Temporary Life Insurance Coverage”. This coverage begins at the time of application, so the applicant has coverage while waiting for the full underwriting process to be complete. Applications can take a week to as long as a couple of months, depending on the applicant’s medical and lifestyle background. Also worth noting, if the applicant has recently traveled abroad to the virus hotspots, this too could cause a postponed application. Ultimately, the insurance companies are looking at the applicant and asking the question, how big of a risk is this person?

Click here if you would like to learn more about your life insurance options and planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief February 27 2020

Market Brief February 27 2020

Given the abrupt decline in global stock markets over the past seven days, we thought a quick account update might be helpful. The news flow about Coronavirus has been fast and furious, and we’re sure you’re finding plenty of ways to track the day-to-day developments. This brief note will not focus on statistics or predictions about potential outcomes. Instead, we’ll concentrate on the root concerns surrounding the market decline.

Since learning about the outbreak in China, the markets have seesawed between indifference and alarm. The virus was initially thought to be a problem contained to ‘over there’ that was unlikely to spread to the US and Europe. And to be fair, that was essentially the case in previous epidemic scares such as Ebola, SARS, and MERS. While each of those scares took a brief bite out of markets, they never severely impacted global growth. As we all now know, since coronavirus was detected in Italy, Germany, and the US, markets have swiftly reassessed their ambivalence.

Our assessment of the global economy is unavoidably colored by the potential for a global pandemic. The unprecedented municipal/provincial quarantines seen in China and the interruptions to the education/social systems in Japan, Korea, and now Italy are severe. These measures will restrict global supply chains as well as the ability/willingness of consumers to spend. There is little doubt that if these policies remain in force for an extended period that global economic growth will slow and potentially contract. Yet it is still not a foregone conclusion that ‘an extended period’ is necessarily in the cards.

What might put an end to the market anxiety? Well, the obvious answer is that an effective therapy/vaccine would offer relief to those with severe illness, as well as restore confidence in consumers. Additionally, a reaffirmation of accommodative monetary policy and a pledge by governments to provide fiscal support could help buffer against recession. In fact, the fiscal/monetary playbook being used in China has already begun to yield support to their markets and economy.

The visceral nature of the virus and the potential disruption to people’s daily lives makes this period in the markets especially tense. And going forward, we expect the market will continue to be headline-driven with knee jerk reactions to both the upside and downside. 

As always, we are keeping an open mind to both positive and negative outcomes. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out. We will plan on sending more detailed updates in the coming weeks/months as necessary.

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Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief February 10 2020

Market Brief February 10 2020

Valentine’s Day is almost here, and the stock market continues to show investors plenty of love! The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 3%, S&P 3.17%, and Nasdaq 4.04%. The coronavirus remains a serious threat, but markets shrugged off the virus news in favor of positive U.S. manufacturing data, strong jobs reports, and company earnings. The Dow and S&P index finished the week with the best performance since the 5 trading days leading up to June 7, 2019. The Nasdaq had it’s best week since November 30, 2018.

The number of coronavirus cases continue to grow and estimates of economic growth for China continue to fall. The coronavirus has spread to different industries at different times. Initially, the travel and oil industries took a hit, as obvious travel restrictions were put into place. Oil prices are down 20% since January. Retail chains, such as Starbucks, also took a hit as many stores in China were closed. Currently, the healthcare industry is taking it on the chin, due to cancelled surgeries and disruption in supply chain. Technology may be on the horizon, as companies like Apple look at their own supply chain and impact the virus will have on production. Throughout February corporate earnings calls, the theme was similar, it is too early to tell the impact, but keep a close eye on what is happening. As of last night, the coronavirus death toll has exceeded that of the SARS virus.

Enter Federal Reserve. After Wednesday’s meeting, Wall Street was leaning towards another rate cut. This belief evaporated by Friday when the jobs report was released and the results were very strong. In Germany, industrial production fell in December by 3.5%, the largest drop post-financial crisis. Global woes remain an area of concern.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 1.98%, S&P up 3.0%, and Nasdaq up 6.1%. What else? For the S&P companies reporting in January, no dividends were cut, same result as January 2019, and 41 companies increased their dividends, which is up from 36 a year ago. Due to low bond yields, investors are flocking to real estate mutual funds and REIT investments. As reported by EPFR Global, $11B of money flowed into mutual funds with a real estate focus in 2019, and another $3B has moved there in 2020.

Have a great week!

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.