Market Brief – 2020 Mid-Year Review

Market Brief 2020 Mid-Year Review

Dog days of summer have arrived. For 2020, it feels like the dog days arrived in March. From the moment the pandemic began to spread, to stay-at-home orders, to lock-downs, to protest rallies, to reopening phases, and back to more restrictions… what a year, and we are only halfway home. Didn’t even mentions the murder hornets! Let’s take a minute to catch our breath and see where we have been, where we are, and where we will go. Currently, we are in the midst of earnings season. Big name stocks will report second quarter earnings this week. Last week the main indexes finished mixed. The Dow up 2.3%, S&P up 1.25%, and Nasdaq down 1.1%. The S&P 500 outperformed the Nasdaq index by the widest margin since February 2016. The markets were mainly buoyed by progress of a virus vaccine.

What Happened?

The year started off strong through mid-February. Early cases and the fast spread of the coronavirus took hold in Asia and quickly jumped country borders to become a worldwide pandemic. Just about a month from the market peak in February came the market lows in March, a 33.9% drop for the S&P index. In just a few weeks, the U.S. economy erased 7 years of employment gains. 30 million Americans lost jobs, driving unemployment as high as 22% in April. By June, the unemployment rate hovered around 14%. Still extremely high, but significantly lower from 2 months prior.

In March, the Fed stepped in and provided a backstop to the equity markets. Stabilizing and possibly adding turbo to the economy via stimulus for individuals and businesses. The pandemic accelerated tech disruption. It changed how companies reach consumers, how supply chains work, how to deal with remote employees, and still build their brands.

Where Are We Today?

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 6.54%, S&P down 0.2%, and Nasdaq up 17.0% through the close on Friday. Last week, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin said the Trump administration and Senate leadership are discussing a new stimulus bill. The end of July is the target time frame as the previous stimulus benefits are ending. The housing market reports are exceeding expectation. Current metrics show a shortage of existing home inventory, limited housing labor to build new homes, and a shortage of entry level homes for the first time home buyer. Historically low mortgage rates help boost the housing demand. Labor income across the board is surging and consumer spending is rebounding.

The markets are in fairly good position today. Much of the strength is attributed to the Fed and swift implementation of monetary policy. With interest rates near zero, investors are willing to pay for future earnings. Growth stocks have done well, value stocks have lagged. When the economy improves and interest rates rise, growth stocks will be challenged by high valuations. Communities have begun to re-open. The U.S. seems to have chosen independence over lock-down. This has led to a recent uptick in coronavirus cases. Deaths due to the virus have decreased as health care has gotten smarter about how to handle symptomatic cases. The resurgence of hiring and end of mass layoffs indicate the job market is recovering. While the decreasing layoffs and increasing hires offer hope, the reopening process has been trending in the wrong direction.

Where Are We Going?

It’s election season. From here on out, politics will headline media reports. Snippets and quotes from leadership on both sides will sway the markets. Bigger than the election is the Fed’s actions. Interest rates are low and likely to remain low for a very long time. This creates a scenario of easy lending and the opportunity for trillions of dollars to remain invested in the market. The future months will measured by the resurgence of the coronavirus, how quickly a vaccine can be developed, another round of monetary stimulus, and the upcoming election. If you thought the first half of 2020 was a roller coaster, the second half might be just as wild! Take care and be safe.

Market Brief’s are taking a summer hiatus, see you at the end of August!

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Market Brief July 6, 2020

Market Brief July 6 2020

Welcome back after the holiday weekend. The markets welcomed us back with a big day today, all indexes were in the green! This positive trend is a continuation from the previous week. Last week all indexes finished up. The Dow up 3.3%, S&P 4.0%, and Nasdaq 4.6%. The markets had a short week due to the holiday observance on Friday. Virus cases continue to rise. The Fed remains extremely helpful. And election season is right around the corner.

Last Week

The markets shrugged off the rising Covid cases. The S&P 500, Dow, and Nasdaq all finished their best quarters in decades. Manufacturing data was better than expected. June payroll was released last Thursday morning, and the positive report sent stocks soaring. The report indicated that 4.8 million jobs were added in the month of June. The U.S. reported a daily record of 52,000 new cases in a 24-hour period. The Fed continues to pump money into the economy. Chances of another round of stimulus are high. And progress for a Covid vaccine get better each day.

The Week Ahead

The markets are in a historically bullish time frame, June 26-July 11. Historically, the market gains 6.3% over this time frame. If history repeats, the indexes could hit all-time highs. On the flip side, it is an election year. The markets tend to fall prior to the election. The beginning of earnings season could help buck the trend as quarterly reports will be released in mid-July.

The U.S. labor market has recouped nearly 1/3 of March and April job losses, but employment fractures linger. Initial jobless claims have provided one of the most current pictures of the state of the economy and have stayed stubbornly high. Continuing claims came in at 19 million last week, so many Americans are still receiving unemployment benefits. This suggest s that either the first wave of job losses continues, or businesses that have re-opened are beg inning to shutter. With the increase of Covid cases, another lock-down is not likely, but delayed progression is inevitable.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 9.5%, S&P down 3.1%, and Nasdaq up 13.8% through the close on Friday.

Have a great week. Stay cool and safe!

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Market Brief June 29, 2020

Market Brief June 29 2020

Summer is full swing and so is the heat! The markets continue to sweat up and down. Last week all indexes finished down. The Dow down 3.3%, S&P 2.8%, and Nasdaq 1.9%. The markets fell mid last week as virus cases rose. More states delayed or paused reopening plans. Some small businesses chose to close their own stores.

Last Week

The V-shaped economic recovery is being challenged. Virus cases rose over 30% in some states last week. 33 states showed increases in cases. States, such as Texas and Florida, closed bars and reduced restaurant capacity. Bank shares fell as the Fed ordered them to stop share buyback programs and dividend payouts. The global economy shows signs of recovery based on PMI economic reports. The indexes fell for the second weekly loss in the past three weeks.

The Week Ahead

The markets are closed on Friday in observance of Independence Day holiday. Jobs data being released on Thursday morning will headline the reporting week. Pending home sales in May were expected to increase 18%, and the reading came in at 44.3% for May! That is good news for the economy. In fact, the coronavirus contraction could end up being the shortest U.S. recession ever. And the recession may already be over. Despite the worst part potentially behind us, recovery will take a long time. During 10 recessions since 1950, it took an average of 30 months for the lost jobs to finally return. Not to mention, the two previous recoveries took longer, 4 and 6 years respectively. Many more jobs were lost from the virus, so the rebound might be here now, but full recovery may take much longer.

To put the recession behind us two points are in focus. The first, improving health situation. Second, continued federal government support. The latter picture is more clear. The former, not so much. Federal unemployment benefits expire at the end of July. However, with the recent rise in cases, renewing these benefit programs may be a reality. Current discussion for another round of stimulus includes $1.5 trillion package. At the end of the day, the markets continue to worry about another outbreak. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 12.3%, S&P down 6.8%, and Nasdaq up 8.74% through the close on Friday.

Have a fun and safe 4th of July holiday!

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Market Brief June 8 2020

Market Brief June 8 2020

Despite protests, ongoing pandemic, and fresh trade war barbs with China, the stock market rally continues. Positive news regarding a vaccine, European stimulus, and better than expected unemployment reports spurred the market. Indexes were up across the board, the Dow up 6.8%, S&P up 4.9%, and the Nasdaq 3.4% on the week.

This Past Week

The recession that started in March is the sharpest downturn since the Great Depression. As it turns out, it was also the shortest. This does not mean the US is fully recovered, or even close; a full recovery is going to take at least a few years. But look for more positive numbers from here on out, including next week’s reports on retail sales, industrial production, and home building. Friday’s employment report should leave little doubt that the US economy has already hit bottom and is starting to recover.

Meanwhile, initial jobless claims fell for the ninth consecutive week, and continuing claims remain below the peak hit in the week ending May 9, both consistent with an economy that is already hit bottom. The May jobs report unexpectedly showed a net 2.5 million jobs returned to the labor market and the unemployment rate dropped to 13.3% versus rising to consensus 19.4%.

The Week Ahead

Wednesday’s Federal Reserve’s monetary policy statement and economic projections is the week’s key risk event. One data point does not define a trend, so Friday’s blockbuster employment report is unlikely to materially change their somber economic outlook. Wednesday and Thursday’s CPI and
PPI reports offer updates on U.S. inflation.

Profits will be down substantially in the second quarter, but should recover strongly in the several quarters thereafter. No one knows for sure what the second half will bring, much less 2021 and beyond. But we think that, like in the past, those who have faith in the future will be rewarded. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 5.0%, S&P down 1.1%, and Nasdaq up 9.4%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief May 18 2020

Market Brief May 18 2020

Fed Chair Powell reiterated the committee’s outlook for the economy was highly uncertain and that unemployment may peak in the coming month. Another 2.9 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, bringing the 8-week total to nearly 37 million. The bright side, continuing claims ‘only’ rose to 22.8 million from 22.4 million. This is another week of increasing claims at a decreasing rate. The markets all finished down for the week. It was the Dow and Nasdaq’s worst week since week ended April 3, and the S&P 500’s worst week since March 20.

Last Week

Volatility rose last week as confidence in the recovery and re-openings went back and forth. With some parts of the country slowly opening, there are glimmers of hope. Consumer confidence, measured by the University of Michigan, rose slightly in the May preliminary reading. Mortgage applications rose for the fourth straight week. Refinancing slowed, but it is still up 200% compared to the previous year, spurred by low interest rates.

At the same time, U.S and China are back at each other. The Trump administration ordered the federal employee retirement fund not to invest in Chinese companies. Specifically, companies that could be sanctioned for actions supporting the spread of the coronavirus. The unemployment total for the last two months has now reached 36.5 million Americans. For the week, the Dow fell 2.7%, the S&P 500 fell 2.3%, and the Nasdaq fell 1.2%.

This Week

As the economy goes through an unsynchronized reopening process, it seems apparent that any decline in unemployment is unlikely to match the pace of its ascent higher. Economists are projecting the U.S. economy to contract at 6.6% this year. The previous estimate was a contraction of 4.9%. The high unemployment, coupled with declining consumption and a fresh spat between U.S./China keeps everything on the rocks.

Politically, lawmakers are weighing a fresh stimulus. The House passed the $3 trillion spending plan. On the data watch, U.S. building permits will be released on Tuesday. This gauge indicates housing activity as some states edge back to “normal”. Thursday, weekly unemployment claims will be released, and Fed Chair Powell speaks. Wall Street investors will be very tuned into what he has to say.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 17.0%, S&P down 11.4%, and Nasdaq up 0.5%.

Have a fun and safe Halloween week!

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Market Brief May 4, 2020

Market Brief May 4 2020

The markets are unsure. Strange to say it, but the markets do not know what to think of the current situation. The market makers are trying to figure out what happens next. Right now, we are sitting in no man’s land. The volatility has calmed down. Current volatility is less than half from the peak in March. Unemployment is through the roof. 30 million unemployment claims have been filed in the last 5 weeks. The Fed stepped in, like the knight in shining armor and made tremendous moves to help companies and individuals. However, we are not back to business as usual. And we do not have a definitive time frame to do so. And we still have people dying everyday and more are still contracting the virus.

Last Week

The markets went up as states slowing began allowing businesses to reopen. Better news came on Wednesday when the drug company Gilead, announced it’s drug met preliminary goals in a study. The end of the week was not as good. Thursday’s jobless claims piled on an already ridiculously high number. On Friday, news of the U.S. retaliating towards China sent the markets even lower heading into the weekend.

For the week, the Dow finished down 0.22%, S&P 500 down 0.21%, and the Nasdaq down 0.34%.

Looking Ahead

Focus will be on the states that reopened; Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. If there is a spike in virus cases, restrictions may be imposed. If those states do not see a resurgence in virus cases, others might be encouraged to lift their restrictions sooner. The economic data is numbing. The has not been positive economic news as of late. Investors understand it is ugly, and the reports could get worse before improving.

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin has forecast a fall in 2nd-quarter growth, with a bounce back in July. For the year, the Dow is down 16.8%, S&P 500 down 12.4%, and Nasdaq down 4.1%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief April 27 2020

Market Brief April 27 2020

The markets snapped a 2-week win streak, falling slightly last week. As expected, the economic news was dismal. Unemployment numbers continue to rise. The five week total now exceeds 26 million. The virus continues to wreak havoc, claiming over 200,000 lives around the world, and over 50,000 in the United States. Markets slid as news reported that drug remdesivir, from Gilead Sciences, results were less than positive.

Global manufacturing data dropped on the lowest output, new orders, and employment numbers on record. The oil industry tanked early in the week as contracts were expiring, before recovering by weeks end. Oil’s roller coaster is attributable to low demands for oil, oversupply, and speculation of May crude oil. Low oil prices is great for everyone, except, nobody can go anywhere! So the relief at the pump for unemployed individuals does not go as far as when there is full employment. U.S. home sales fell last week. Durable goods orders dropped over 14% in April.

Despite the efforts of further government stimulus, to aid small business and the overall unemployment picture, the indexes finished down. For the week ending 4/24, the Dow finished down 1.9%, S&P down 1.3%, and the Nasdaq down 0.2%.

The Week Ahead

Today starts a big week of corporate earnings, with 172 companies reporting. Notably the big tech names; Apple, Amazon, FaceBook, and Microsoft. According to FactSet, for the 24% of S&P 500 companies already reporting, the blended earnings decline for the first quarter is -15.8%.

Many companies have suspended their guidance. Thus far, 106 of the S&P 500 companies suspended 2020 guidance. That leaves investors with little to work off of. The companies dropping guidance are following the advice from the SEC. Instead, the calls are focused on the current assessment of the situation and how it affects their business right now.

The economic data paints a dismal picture. Continued focus will be on Thursday’s unemployment figure. Other data of interest this week include Mortgage Applications, Personal Income, and US Manufacturing. None of which will be a surprise, however, the data will provide clarity regarding just how bad. The key for investors is to focus on how quickly we are going to recover. This will depend on finding ways to carefully ease lockdowns. Also, how severe the Coronavirus will be in the months ahead and how quickly vaccines are made. Year-to-date, the Dow is down 16.7%, S&P down 12.2%, and the Nasdaq down 3.8%.

Have a safe week!

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Market Brief April 20 2020

Market Brief April 20 2020

The market rally continued. Finishing strong Friday due to a potential COVID-19 treatment. The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week. Dow up 2.2%, S&P 3.0%, and Nasdaq 6.1%. Not all was good as many banks reported earnings last week. The large banks are preparing for potential consumer and corporate loan defaults. Unemployment increases continue. In the last four weeks, 22 million Americans have filed for unemployment. This volume erases ten years of job growth. Retail Sales dropped in March and Industrial Production fell to the lowest level since 1946.

So why did the markets finish higher? Good question. The markets response was focused on two things. First, the potential vaccine treatment. If this treatment works or has a strong recovery rate, this is great news for the current time and the future. The markets want to be reassured if the virus returns there is a defense in place. Second, President Trump announced a plan to reopen states. Going back to “normal” is good for small business, consumers, and income earners. It is clear “life after virus” will be different, igniting the economy is certainly a positive for financial markets.

The Week Ahead

COVID-19 hospitalizations are declining in hotspot areas. Government officials are working on plans to gradually reopen their states. On Thursday, another round of unemployment claims is expected. Friday’s durable goods order report will shed light on business spending amid the health crisis.

Corporate earnings season continues. The focus of these calls remain to be the gauge of how negatively affected consumption and credit have been for both consumers and businesses. As well as, the prospects of doing business during the next few quarters. And lastly, for firms not on solid footing, investors will look to their liquidity as key indicator of strength going forward.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 15.0%, S&P down 11.0%, and Nasdaq up 3.6%. As the post image says, “Together We Do It” – Have a safe week!

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Market Brief April 13 2020

Market Brief April 13 2020

Looking for a job? So are the other 17 million that have lost their jobs in the last 3 weeks. COVID-19 confirmed cases passed 1.7 million, with almost 30% in the United States. And $62 billion was pulled from equity funds last week. Not to mention consumer sentiment fell to a 9 year low. So how did the markets finish the week before Easter? How about the best week since 1974! The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week. Dow up 12.7%, S&P 12.1%, and Nasdaq 10.6%.

The markets seem positive that the end is near. Stocks rally last week was mainly driven by the Federal Reserve action. Pumping $2.3 trillion in additional lending programs. The S&P 500 recorded the best week since October 1974. Why would the markets go up with all the bad news? Markets are forward looking. Pricing in all the information and looking through the mud ahead. Economist estimates for the second quarter are all over the board. All agree Q2 is in the tank. Q3 is where the predictions become less clear. Some believe a continued slowdown, while others expect a massive recovery. Hard to grasp to say the least.

The Week Ahead

Following updated COVID-19 updates will be oil and corporate earnings headlining the week. All economic data is basically factored in and the attention moves to the individual companies performance and expectation. How bad was Q1? What will happen in Q2? What changes were made to adjust to quarantine life? When can employees work full-time again? Bank reporting is heavy this week, led by JP Morgan, Wells Fargo, and Bank of America.

Unemployment numbers on Thursday will be watched closely. Two other economic reports worth noting are the Retail Sales on Wednesday and U.S. Building Permits on Thursday. These report will be for the month of March. Both expected to be ugly. Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 16.9%, S&P down 13.6%, and Nasdaq down 9.1%.

Have a safe week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief April 6 2020

Market Brief April 6 2020

With each passing day, we hope to be one day closer to the end of this ugly virus. Until that day arrives, continue the social distancing and best hygiene habits. The news ahead regarding the economic state and corporate guidance are likely going to be dismal. Economic numbers outside of jobs report will tell one tale. Company reports during earnings calls will tell another. This past week, unemployment rate jumped to 4.4%, from lows of 3.5%. Weekly unemployment claims surged north of 10,000,000 over the last two weeks. If you have a job, be thankful. The monthly employment numbers are usually the most important. They providing the first, in-depth perspective of the U.S. economy.

The most attention during the week is the weekly job report that comes out each Thursday morning. All eyes again will be watching very closely. Economists ahead of this downward spiral are predicting unemployment to reach as high as 17%! A depressing reality to think about. Jim Reid, a strategist for Deutsche Bank, stated “the contraction from the coronavirus this year is likely to rank among the 10 worst for many countries… that’s remarkable, given the size of the monetary and fiscal stimulus that governments have provided.”

What’s Ahead

The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished down last week. Dow dropped 2.7%, S&P fell 2.1%, and Nasdaq down 1.7%. The Dow finished the first quarter, which ended last Tuesday, down 23%. The week ahead is mixed with important economic data, as well as, a couple corporate reports worth reading.

Tomorrow, Levi Strauss reports quarterly results. Usually, not a widely followed report, but given the impact of incomes and jobs, the report will provide impact on discretionary spending. On Wednesday, Costco Wholesale reports sales data for March. Another indication of recent spending impact since the virus began hitting U.S. and lock downs began mid-month of this report. Thursday reports include the Producer Price Index, a measure of inflation. Followed by the weekly job report, which comes after a week of 6.6 million claims. Friday reports also include the Consumer Price Index to see the impact of mainly retail prices for consumers in March. Friday the equity markets are closed in observance of Good Friday.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 26.2%, S&P down 22.9%, and Nasdaq up 17.8%.

Quarantine continues – have a fun and safe week!

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Market Brief March 30 2020

Tiger King Market Update

Yes, Tiger King fans, this post is for you. Since the Tiger King rage went viral last week, the market has also hit record setting performance days! Is it safe to say Joe Exotic should be the next Fed Chairman? It’s not a bear market, not a bull market, but a Tiger market! I’m all in … to the show, not stocks…

OK, time to get serious. Market dip to market rip! The Dow soared by 21% over a 3-day span, closing up 12.77% for the week. The largest 3-day gain since October 8, 1931, during the Great Depression. The Dow’s weekly finish was the best weekly gain since 1938, despite losing 4% on Friday. The S&P and Nasdaq indexes also finished up for the week, 10.26% and 9.05%, respectively. The indexes ignored the record weekly unemployment claims of 3.28 million! A record setting number in it’s own right. The U.S. also passed China last week with the number of virus infection cases. The saving grace for markets last week was the announced $2.2 trillion relief plan.

Despite the market bounce that began last Tuesday and continued today, large and fast rallies are frequent characteristics of longer-term bearish periods in the market. The eventual recovery from this public health crisis will be gradual, similar to the financial crisis recovery. The recovery is still unknown, and according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, “the virus makes the timeline,” and that will probably determine the markets recovery as well.

The Bailout

Stimulus, bailout, virus relief, The CARES act, whatever you want to call, came to the rescue at the end of last week. The fiscal policy pumps trillions into the economy, aimed at providing liquidity to households and businesses. These include IRS checks, a major expansion in unemployment benefits, as well as a broad combination of grants, loans, and loan guarantees for businesses (large and small), hospitals, schools, and state and local governments. This stimulus is designed to buffer the economy in the short-term, as the virus hit the hard and fast across the country. Long-term the effects may linger for some time. The upcoming quarterly earnings season will provide investors better guidance on how hard companies have been hit.

The Week Ahead

Policymakers’ huge support has helped stabilize risk, but long-term market stability and declining volatility hinges on the apex of coronavirus infections being in the rear-view mirror. Economic reports for the week include a slew of data including manufacturing and employment. This week’s focus will be on the jobless claims number, showing a more clear picture of the economic state.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 24.2%, S&P down 20.96%, and Nasdaq down 16.4%. Volatility remains high and historically market rallies come back after volatility drops to normal range.

Have a safe week and remember to go for a walk outside (after finishing the Tiger King season on Netflix)!

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Positive Investing News

Positive Investing News

Finding good news right now can be tough. The Q&A below highlights some of the positive investing news that can result from a crisis.

What is the one positive that you see coming out of this crisis
that is least expected?

Buying opportunity! Valuations have soared during the bull market run following the 2008-2009 recession, individuals interested in long-term investment growth should consider this as one of the best discount sales in recent years. Many people I speak to wish they could go back to the 2008-2009 time period and buy stocks. Today, some quality companies are down 30-80% year-to-date.

What new businesses will break into the marketplace, as a result of this crisis, that no one expected to grow so fast?

Technology has proven to be the winner. The S&P 500 Info Tech sector index has greatly outperformed the market. Included in this index are businesses supporting those working from home, such as, video conferencing and e-document companies. 

What existing industries do you feel will rebound the fastest
as things begin to return to normal?

The travel industry is taking an enormous hit. This will not last. Consider how many people will need a vacation after being stuck in their homes for a month (or longer). Or even had their trips postponed. Hotels, airlines, cruises, they are beaten down right now but will bounce back as the virus is contained. The stimulus will also aid, to some extent, discretionary spending for some. Travel is a huge component of discretionary spending.

Click here if you would like to learn more about our thoughts on Positive Investing News. Also, to discuss options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

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Market Brief March 23 2020

Market Brief March 23 2020

Last week was the worst week the stock markets have seen since 2008. Continued developments of the coronavirus dominated the news, as the number of cases in the U.S. surpassed 15,000. This news left the indexes in a downward free fall. The three major indexes all finished down between 14-17% for the week ending March 20. The increase in cases is also getting the attention of life insurance, as I wrote about last week and you can read it here. Forget gold and oil as great market hedges, the future is now in toilet paper and hand sanitizer! (Just kidding).

To no surprise, economic data last week disappointed. China sales and industrial production was down double digits compared to last year. German economic sentiment also fell to the lowest on record. The lone bright spot from last week, was U.S. sales. For the month of February, U.S. retail sales came in 4.35% higher compared to last year. New home sales dropped for the month, while existing home sales jumped 6.5%. The existing home sales grew to the highest level since 2007, proving the real estate market was on solid ground prior to the virus outbreak.

The Week Ahead

The week ahead will be focused on stimulus news in the U.S., as well as, the flattening of the coronavirus infection curve. Wednesday’s durable goods order report is expected to be positive. However, this could be the last positive report we see for awhile, as business and productivity slows during the state ordered or self-mandated quarantine phases. Thursday’s unemployment claim report will likely soar, as businesses cut staff and hours for workers.

Big Picture and Recovery

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 32.81%, S&P down 28.66%, and Nasdaq down 23.3%. According to Wilshire, this is approximately $12 trillion of wealth that has evaporated. Due to the recent domestic productivity halt, most banks have cut 2nd Quarter growth outlooks significantly. Goldman Sachs has revised their 2nd Quarter outlook to -24%, while J.P. Morgan cut their outlook to -14%.

The consensus for recovery is based on three outcomes. First, how quickly will the virus be contained. Second, whether businesses will have access to enough liquidity, or capital, over the next 90-180 days. And lastly, whether the fiscal stimulus can stabilize growth forecasts. Until then, volatility looks to remain high and sensitive to the latest news stemming from the virus developments and economic impacts.

Keep your distance, share the TP, and continue to wash your hands this week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief March 16 2020

Market Brief March 16 2020

Not sure where to start today? Every post seems to be outdated the minute it is published! Whether a virus update, Fed decision, a political speech, geo-political affairs, or another stock industry takes a dive downward. Volatility remains high, driving the big daily swings in the stock market.

Last week, President Trump initiated a travel ban and events across the country ceased immediately. Last night, the Fed stepped in with another rate cut. The reaction from the market was one of fear, driving indexes lower, and initiating the third trading halt in the last month to start the week. Despite the historic big rally on Friday, all indexes finished the week down. The Dow dropped 10.46%, the S&P 500 fell 8.86%, and the Nasdaq dropped 8.18%.

The Week Ahead

The week ahead includes Retail Sales, Industrial Production, and Housing Start data. There reports will provide a gauge of the consumer and business sentiment during this time of uncertainty. The mortgage rate drops may act as a tailwind for home buyers and those refinancing, in the near term, but the prevailing headwind of the coronavirus economic disruption remains front and center. Coronavirus focus will be on the growth of new cases, as well as, policies designed to identify and subdue the outbreak.

Big Picture

Year-to-date index performance; Dow down 18.7%, S&P down 16.0%, and Nasdaq down 12.2%. The media is publishing a lot of information regarding corrections, bear markets, and recessions. Let’s break those down. A correction is typically considered when the stock indexes drop 10% from the recent highs. A bear market typically is defined by a drop of 20% from recent highs. And a recession is 2 or more consecutive quarters of declining GDP growth. Our current economic state may be a recession, however, we will not know until the quarterly numbers are published after Q2 2020 is over. Yes, the markets corrected more than 20% from the highs on February 19, therefore, indexes are in bear market territory. Turnaround signs remain high correlated to virus improvement. The slowing of new cases, the decline of deaths, and the increasing number of recoveries. Until then, volatility remains here to stay. Corporate guidance up to this point is hard to judge. The next round of corporate earnings will be very important regarding the impact of the virus disruption and growth prospects going forward. Market volatility is inevitable when investing in the stock market.

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Market Brief February 24 2020

Market Brief February 24 2020

The last week in February is here and the markets have dropped on the news of the increasing spread of the coronavirus. Impact beyond health concerns is the slowdown in supply chains for companies, and the downward effect on economic activity. The US economic report of the Services PMI dropped to a 76-month low in February. This follows a January report that was at a 5-month high. The bright spots from last week are found in manufacturing confidence and housing reports. Both housing starts and building permits figures remain at decade highs, with housing starts at the highest level since 2006. WalMart’s earnings report was positive, in-line with expectations. Significant to the investor, as WalMart is a good gauge of the consumer strength, and sales were up 5.7% last year. With that said, the Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished down last week. The Dow down 1.4%, S&P 1.3%, and Nasdaq 1.6%.

This week will have plenty of economic reports to digest, but the coronavirus developments remain top priority. Tuesday’s consumer confidence report will shed light on whether consumers are concerned with the virus or not. Globally, Chinese banks may be on rocky ground. During the month of January, banks in China had loaned 3 times the amount that was loaned in December. Corporate loans also increased 7 times during the same time period. Debt levels this high could cause concern for long-term recovery and repayment issues.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 1.59%, S&P up 3.31%, and Nasdaq up 6.73%. I continue to encourage buy and hold investing for the long run and potential short-term disruptions can give investors long term opportunities.

Have a great week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief February 10 2020

Market Brief February 10 2020

Valentine’s Day is almost here, and the stock market continues to show investors plenty of love! The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 3%, S&P 3.17%, and Nasdaq 4.04%. The coronavirus remains a serious threat, but markets shrugged off the virus news in favor of positive U.S. manufacturing data, strong jobs reports, and company earnings. The Dow and S&P index finished the week with the best performance since the 5 trading days leading up to June 7, 2019. The Nasdaq had it’s best week since November 30, 2018.

The number of coronavirus cases continue to grow and estimates of economic growth for China continue to fall. The coronavirus has spread to different industries at different times. Initially, the travel and oil industries took a hit, as obvious travel restrictions were put into place. Oil prices are down 20% since January. Retail chains, such as Starbucks, also took a hit as many stores in China were closed. Currently, the healthcare industry is taking it on the chin, due to cancelled surgeries and disruption in supply chain. Technology may be on the horizon, as companies like Apple look at their own supply chain and impact the virus will have on production. Throughout February corporate earnings calls, the theme was similar, it is too early to tell the impact, but keep a close eye on what is happening. As of last night, the coronavirus death toll has exceeded that of the SARS virus.

Enter Federal Reserve. After Wednesday’s meeting, Wall Street was leaning towards another rate cut. This belief evaporated by Friday when the jobs report was released and the results were very strong. In Germany, industrial production fell in December by 3.5%, the largest drop post-financial crisis. Global woes remain an area of concern.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 1.98%, S&P up 3.0%, and Nasdaq up 6.1%. What else? For the S&P companies reporting in January, no dividends were cut, same result as January 2019, and 41 companies increased their dividends, which is up from 36 a year ago. Due to low bond yields, investors are flocking to real estate mutual funds and REIT investments. As reported by EPFR Global, $11B of money flowed into mutual funds with a real estate focus in 2019, and another $3B has moved there in 2020.

Have a great week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief January 21 2020

Market Brief January 21 2020

The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 1.8%, S&P 2.0%, and Nasdaq 2.3%. The indices continued to rise from solid economic reports coming from the housing, retail, and pricing reports, as well as, easing tensions between the U.S. and China. With the trade news somewhat behind us, focus turns towards corporate profits as Q4 earnings season is underway.

This week includes 58 more earnings reports by S&P 500 companies, along with home sales data and jobs numbers keeping investors attention. U.S. existing home sales have missed three consecutive months, so Wednesday’s report will be important. Inflation remains a major headwind for investors.

Caution ahead. The yield curve inversion in 2019 still lingers. As market history proves, the inverted yield curve foresees recession up to 2 years following the initial inversion. Wage growth and corporate earnings. As wages continue to rise and unemployment remains historically low, this puts companies in a tough position. As the expenses rise, the dilemma is whether to pass the cost to the customer, or eat it. Either way, this can lead to a negative outlook for stocks, as companies either will have shrinking margins, or contribute to inflation by way of rising prices. This is worth keeping an eye on going forward.

Have a great week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief January 13 2020

Market Brief January 13 2020

Happy Monday to you all! The markets quickly pushed aside the idea of increasing tension between the United States and Iran, as cooler heads prevailed. Global news is now instantly spread and processed by the markets, and being an election year, further geopolitical volatility should be expected. During an address last Wednesday, President Trump gave no signal of further escalation. The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 0.6%, S&P 0.9%, and Nasdaq 1.7%.

The markets shook off the Middle East tensions and lower payroll figure released on Friday, the U.S. economy added 145,000 jobs in December. Despite being weaker than expected, the jobs report extended the streak of gains to 111 months in a row. The decade wrapped up with 10 straight years of job growth as well. Wage inflation reported a 2.9% increase year-over-year, outpacing current inflation levels. Europe economic reports were positive last week. The Eurozone’s December services PMI’s were revised higher and industrial production rose higher.

U.S. inflation, retail, and housing reports fill up the week of economic news. 2019 holiday sales were a record, so the attention is focused on the Retail Sales report released on Thursday.

From the Stock Trader’s Almanac – the first five trading days of the new year were positive, indicating an increased likelihood of an up year for the market. The Santa Claus rally was also positive. Whenever both the Santa Claus rally and first week of trading are positive, the Dow has gained an average 11.5% for the year and rose 80% of the time.

Year-to-date index performance will begin tracking once we have a month under our belt in 2020. The Oklahoma/Ohio State National title was suppose to be tonight! Since we don’t have a dog in the fight, we will take the Tigers to win the championship! And for the sports nuts reading this, I am referring to the Orange and White tigers!

Have a great week!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief Dec 23 2019

Market Brief Dec 23 2019

Finish strong! The market continues strength into the holiday season and finishing the year with new record highs! The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 1.1%, S&P 1.7%, and Nasdaq 2.2%. The indices reach for record all-time highs as trade sentiment remains positive and economic reports remain strong from both the U.S. and China. Caution of weakness remain with Europe’s slowing economy and domestic manufacturing.

What a year it has been! Coming off a terrible Q4 of 2018, the question was how far or how much more could the market be beaten down. The market took a few more punches the first week of January, then the snap back rally began. Pullbacks came and went in May, August, and September, stirred up by the trade war uncertainty with China, and perceived economic weakness globally. All pullbacks were short lived, following the Fed’s stance of easing rates, which occurred three times in 2019, and the strength of the U.S. consumer. The theme for the year really is the U.S. Not just companies who primarily have revenues in the U.S, but the consumer and U.S. economy as well. Companies with more than 50% of revenues in the U.S. achieved much better earnings reports than companies selling globally. And the U.S. consumer is strong; unemployment is low, wages are rising, and debt delinquencies are low.

So how about them markets?! Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 22.0%, S&P up 28.5%, and Nasdaq up 34.5%. These numbers are great across the board, given recession fears were news headlines the entire year, impeachments news dominated the latter part of the year, and a trade war with China was never meant to end! Excellent match-up on the last MNF game of the season tonight, for entertainment purposes to keep the pick ’em streak alive its the Pack over the Vikings!

Thanks for reading this market brief, have a fun and safe holiday season, see you in 2020!

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This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.

Market Brief December 16 2019

Market Brief December 16 2019

The Dow, S&P, and Nasdaq indexes all finished up last week Dow up 0.49%, S&P 0.77%, and Nasdaq 0.93%. The markets continued to march higher following the final Fed meeting of the year and trade optimism heading into the weekend. The Fed closed the final meeting of the year leaving interest rates unchanged due to favorable economic conditions, strong jobs reports, and low inflation. The U.S. and China reached a phase one trade deal on Friday, easing concerns on the tariff war.

The S&P 500 index has now closed higher in 9 of the last 10 weeks. The Fed meeting last Wednesday went pretty much as expected, no surprises. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell made clear that policies would remain accommodating, positive language for stock market bulls. Powell also reiterated that it would take a significant and sustained rise in inflation for the U.S. Central Bank to raise interests rates in the near term.

Economic reports coming out this week include Tuesday’s Housing Starts for November to give a pulse on the housing market. Wednesday will see the mortgage application report, also provide insight to the housing market, as will Thursday’s existing home sales report. And Friday, Q3 GDP numbers and University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment reports are released. Further details on domestic growth and consumer strength.

Year-to-date index performance; Dow up 20.6%, S&P up 26.4%, and Nasdaq up 31.6%. Stay positive, there are good things going on! Jobs and wages are moving up, companies and consumers continue to benefit from tax cuts, consumer balance sheets look healthy, and serious (90+ day) debt delinquencies are down substantially from post-recession highs. We have a good match-up on MNF tonight, for entertainment purposes to keep the pick ’em streak alive its the Saints over the Colts!

Have a great week! Good luck with your last minute holiday shopping 😉

Click here if you would like to learn more about your options and if we can assist you with your wealth management, investment, and retirement planning.

This website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be specific advice or recommendations. For specific advice or recommendations you would need to meet directly with one of our advisers.